November 2009

Short item Published on November 22, 2009

Combining methods of malaria control

In the October 2, 2009 issue of PloS Computational Biology, a paper was published describing a model estimating the impact of both insecticide-treated bednets (ITN’s) and new fungal biopesticides on the transmission rates and hence prevalence of malaria. These two interventions affect mosquitoes at different ages and stages in their lifecycle. The model demonstrates that Read More

Short item Published on November 22, 2009

The Hidden Epidemic Amongst Former Miners

The article from Tony Davies in this issue of the Quarterly, gives a historical overview on occupational lung disease in South Africa. Recently a report was published by the Health Systems Trust, which highlights the actuality of this topic (2). The aim of the research presented in the report was to investigate health systems surveillance Read More

Short item Published on November 22, 2009

Capacity Building in epidemiological modelling

In July 2009 Dr Gavin Hitchcock reported on the Training and Capacity Building at SACEMA. In the prologue of the report he highlighted the importance of effective multi-disciplinary training in meaningful epidemiological modelling: “The human tragedies associated with disease in Africa and elsewhere continue to appeal our sensibilities and drain our resources: TB, malaria, trypanosomiasis, Read More

Published on November 22, 2009 by

Editorial

In November two meetings took place in Geneva on the decision how, if at all, antiretroviral therapy could be used as an offensive weapon against the HIV pandemic – rather than simply in its current defensive role of keeping alive people who have generally already reached late stages of infection. This article reports on the discussions and most important outcomes of these meetings.

Published on November 22, 2009 by

Age-disparate relationships and condom use among young people in Swaziland

In Swaziland the risk of getting HIV infected is significantly higher among young women compared to young men. These differences cannot be explained by anatomical and hormonal factors that make young women particularly vulnerable to HIV infection. In this article the results of a secondary analysis of the Swaziland Demographic and Health Survey 2006-2007 data is described. In particular, trends and variability in age differences between young men and their female sexual partners are explored. In addition the magnitude of the age difference between sexual partners and the association with consistent condom use is examined.

Published on November 22, 2009 by

Should we have paid more attention to occupational lung disease in South Africa?

South Africa is faced with a public health catastrophe due, in part at least, to the mining activity, which laid the foundation of our economy. In the mines millions of men have worked in dangerous and dusty conditions. There have been three very high risk exposures in South African workplaces: silica, asbestos and tuberculosis, all resulting in serious lung problems. This article gives an historical perspective on the causes of occupational lung disease and what should have been done to lower the risks.

Published on November 22, 2009 by

Every generation needs a new revolution: 200 years in the history of longevity

The huge increase in life expectancy enjoyed by people in the industrialized world since 1800 is among the most remarkable facts in human history. No one living in 18th century Europe could have foreseen that a lifespan of more than 70 years would be possible for the majority – indeed almost everyone. This article presents a historical overview on the reasons for this increase in life expectancy and why this increase is not experienced in all countries – especially African countries.