Damian Kajunguri

Published on June 17, 2014 by

Modelling the Use of Insecticide-Treated Cattle to Control Tsetse and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense in a Multi-host Population

T. b. rhodesiense is the acute form of African human trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness which is common in East and Southern Africa. Trypanosomiasis is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei and transmitted by tsetse flies (genus Glossina spp). Treatment of livestock in sub-Saharan Africa with trypanocidal drugs has been hindered by drug resistance and proves to be too expensive for many farmers. Tsetse control methods include aerial and ground spraying, sterile insect technique, and bait technology, including the use of insecticide-treated cattle (ITC). We compared two techniques of application of insecticides on cattle using a mathematical model: whole-body (WB), where insecticides are applied on the entire animals body and restricted application (RAP), where insecticides are applied on the legs, belly and ears of the animal.

Published on November 30, 2012 by

Modelling the control of Trypanosomiasis using trypanocides or insecticide-treated livestock

Across sub-Saharan Africa, several species of trypanosome, transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp), cause human and animal trypanosomiasis. While interventions can be directed against either the vector or the parasite, emphasis has usually been on the use of drugs to treat the disease both in humans and in livestock. Several advances in our understanding of tsetse biology and ecology and improvements in the cost-effectiveness of tsetse control have revived interest in the vector control approach to disease management. This article discusses and compares two different approaches to the control of trypanosomiasis in cattle: either we can control the disease by treating cattle with insecticides that kill the tsetse vectors without having any direct effect on the trypanosomes. Or we can inject the cattle with trypanocides that kill the parasites but leave the tsetse flies unharmed.