Trypanosomiasis

Short item Published on September 14, 2016

Tsetse and trypanosomiasis modelling workshop

In the last week of June 2016, fifteen scientists converged on Stellenbosch for a week-long intensive workshop, hosted by SACEMA, aimed at sharing their knowledge of the problems and prospects associated with modelling the population dynamics of tsetse flies (Glossina spp) and the trypanosomes that they transmit in Africa to game animals, domestic livestock and humans.

Published on November 30, 2012 by

Editorial: Climate change and tsetse flies

One of the articles in this edition concerns the modelling of the control of the tsetse-borne disease trypanosomiasis using trypanocides or insecticide-treated livestock. SACEMA has been short-listed for WHO/TDR funding of a project focussing on modelling the way in which various climate change scenarios might affect the population dynamics of tsetse flies and the trypanosomes that they transmit. For this study we have access to large, long-term, unique archives of data of the type required to address these questions. These data will be augmented during the study through field studies in Zimbabwe and Tanzania, aimed at understanding the spatiotemporal variability of disease threat and how this is likely to change at different locations and altitudes in the context of climate change. Field studies will address particularly the problem of the interface between humans and tsetse, and suggest optimal methods of disease control.

Published on November 30, 2012 by

Modelling the control of Trypanosomiasis using trypanocides or insecticide-treated livestock

Across sub-Saharan Africa, several species of trypanosome, transmitted by tsetse flies (Glossina spp), cause human and animal trypanosomiasis. While interventions can be directed against either the vector or the parasite, emphasis has usually been on the use of drugs to treat the disease both in humans and in livestock. Several advances in our understanding of tsetse biology and ecology and improvements in the cost-effectiveness of tsetse control have revived interest in the vector control approach to disease management. This article discusses and compares two different approaches to the control of trypanosomiasis in cattle: either we can control the disease by treating cattle with insecticides that kill the tsetse vectors without having any direct effect on the trypanosomes. Or we can inject the cattle with trypanocides that kill the parasites but leave the tsetse flies unharmed.